Sat. Feb 24th, 2024
alert-–-abbie-chatfield’s-former-radio-show-used-in-year-12-vce-exam-paper-after-the-podcaster-credited-her-adhd-for-helping-her-win-a-major-awardAlert – Abbie Chatfield’s former radio show used in Year 12 VCE exam paper after the podcaster credited her ADHD for helping her win a major award

Abbie Chatfield’s former Hit Network radio show Hot Nights has been used in a question on a Year 12 exam paper.

The former reality star, 28, shared the surprising news on Wednesday, posting a text message and a photo of the exam question to her Instagram Story. 

The text message from an anonymous friend read: ‘Abbie, my VCE English exam got me to analyse your interview with [Peking Duk bandmember] Kelli Holliday from Hot Nights!’

Abbie tagged Holliday in the post, saying ‘we’ve made it,’ and shared a follow up picture of the exam itself. 

Abbie, who hosted the Hit Network radio show Hot Nights with Abbie Chatfield from 2022 until quitting this year, captioned the photo of the English exam with: ‘Hot Nights with Abbie/Australian Made lives on!’ 

Abbie Chatfield’s (pictured) former Hit Network radio show Hot Nights has been used in a question on a Year 12 exam paper 

It comes after Abbie recently credited her ADHD diagnosis for helping her win a major podcasting award.

Chatfield won the ACRA award for Podcast Host of the Year last week for her podcast, It’s A Lot.

Held at the ICC Sydney on Saturday, October 14, several radio and podcast hosts gathered to attend the the 34th ACRA Awards.

  The former reality star, 28, shared the surprising news on Wednesday, posting a text message and a photo of the exam question to her Instagram Story

But it appears Abbie did not attend the major awards night.

Taking to Instagram on Tuesday, the podcast host and media personality shared her excitement with several photos of herself holding the award, as well as thanking her crew and workmates.

In a video from her post, Abbie thanked her ADHD diagnosis ‘for not being able to shut the f**k up’.

It comes after Abbie credited her ADHD diagnosis for helping her win a major award

‘Last week I won my first ACRA for Podcast Host of the Year!! A thrill!’ she captioned her post.

‘Tysm to my amazing team at @listnrentertainment Lem, Oscar, Amy, Sam and also Elise, my ADHD for making me talk constantly and MOST IMPORTANTLY!!! Thank you to all the listeners and followers and those who contribute with their nightmare fuels!!’

Abbie revealed it was her first-ever award she’s received that wasn’t by voting. 

The former reality star won the ACRA award for Podcast Host of the Year last week and thanked her ADHD ‘for not being able to shut the f**k up’

‘I started this pod during the first COVID lockdown by myself, recording it and editing it on my living room floor. The fact some of you stuck it out through that dark period is honestly commendable.

‘Anyway this is my first non voting award so I’m pretty stoked!! Leave a nice review on the pod to celebrate, will ya?’

Since walking away from season seven’s The Bachelor as a runner up, the TV star has gone on to host her own radio show, Hot Nights with Abbie Chatfield, and is currently a judge on Channel 10’s The Masked Singer.

In May last year, Abbie revealed she had ‘finally’ been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at the age of 26.

The reality star confirmed the news on her Hot Nights with Abbie radio, saying she’d been trying to get a diagnosis for her symptoms for 18 months.

It appears Abbie did not attend the major awards night

Abbie also said she was disappointed the process was so difficult and ‘inaccessible’ to many, after going to great lengths to get an appointment with a psychiatrist, which eventually cost her ‘around $700’.

‘I’m very happy to say, she got a diagnosis,’ Abbie told her co-host Rohan Edwards.

‘Now I am going to go on medication, the psychiatrist said that I can listen to podcasts, and there’s lots of different coping mechanisms that I can research.’

ADHD is a mental health condition with symptoms that include trouble focusing, hyperactivity and impulsive behaviour.

The adult condition is treated similarly to that of childhood ADHD, with medication and counselling, according to the Mayo Clinic.

WHAT IS ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a behavioural condition defined by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

It affects around five per cent of children in the US. Some 3.6 per cent of boys and 0.85 per cent of girls suffer in the UK. 

Symptoms typically appear at an early age and become more noticeable as a child grows. These can also include:

  • Constant fidgeting 
  • Poor concentration
  • Excessive movement or talking
  • Acting without thinking
  • Inability to deal with stress 
  • Little or no sense of danger 
  • Careless mistakes
  • Mood swings
  • Forgetfulness 
  • Difficulty organising tasks
  •  Continually starting new tasks before finishing old ones
  • Inability to listen or carry out instructions 

Most cases are diagnosed between six and 12 years old. Adults can also suffer, but there is less research into this.

ADHD’s exact cause is unclear but is thought to involve genetic mutations that affect a person’s brain function and structure.

Premature babies and those with epilepsy or brain damage are more at risk. 

ADHD is also linked to anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette’s and epilepsy.  

There is no cure. 

A combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended to relieve symptoms and make day-to-day life easier. 

Source: NHS Choices 

error: Content is protected !!