Tue. Feb 27th, 2024
alert-–-does-$200-bottled-water-taste-any-better-than-what-comes-from-your-faucet?-daily-mail’s-us-health-team-blind-taste-tested-six-premium-brands.-so,-could-they-tell-the-difference-between-the-expensive-stuff-and-tap?Alert – Does $200 bottled water taste any better than what comes from your faucet? Daily Mail’s US health team blind taste-tested six premium brands. So, could they tell the difference between the expensive stuff and tap?

You’d think – or hope – a nearly $200 bottle of water that promotes itself as the ‘Rolls-Royce of waters,’ should be incomparable when up against the stuff that comes out of the faucet. 

But the AlertContent health team struggled to differentiate between the two during a blind taste test of six premium brands of water – some of which have become popular among celebrities like Paris Hilton and Jamie Foxx.

Everyone who tasted the most extortionately priced $184 Bling H2O Original Water guessed it was tap water from the office kitchen sink or another cheaper brand like Poland Spring, which costs between $1 and $2.

Senior Health Reporter Cassidy Morrison took one sip and immediately guessed it was the free stuff, saying ‘I guess I don’t have a discerning palette’ when the truth was revealed.

Emily Joshu, Health and Wellness reporter, thought she was drinking Bling H2O and said it was ‘smoother than the other’ waters and ‘less intense.’ However, it was revealed she was actually hydrating with the free stuff. 

Health reporters Luke Andrews, who thought Bling was tap water called it ‘clean’ and Caitlin Tilley said it ‘tasted the nicest’ but guessed it only cost $15 to $30 per bottle. 

When taking a sip of Poland Spring, a $1 bottle of water from the fridges of a convenience store, I described it as ‘fresh and crisp’ and tasting ‘better than the others.’ I deemed it to be the most expensive, though I only priced it at $20. 

Among the other waters were two sparkling options: one costing $8 and bottled in a way that made us think we were wine tasting at work and another that cost nearly four times that, running $29 and dressed up in a bottle more resembling a high-end champagne. 

Below, AlertContent reveals the other expensive bottles of water we put to the test and explains the difference between common types of H2O.

Bling H2O The Original Water ($181 for 750 ml bottle)  

Bling H2O’s water is slightly alkaline and ‘pleasantly light with a delicately sweet note’

Bling H2O’s motto, ‘Not for everyone…only for those who are bling’ is reflected in its high price point and decadent bottles.

While nearly $200 for a bottle of water seems outlandish, The Original is not even Bling’s most expensive product, with a line ranging from $181 to $920 depending on its bottle design.

Marketed as handcrafted alkaline water and the ‘Rolls-Royce Phantom of all waters,’ bottles of Bling H2O have been seen in the hands of celebrities like Paris Hilton, Jamie Foxx and Gabrielle Union.

The water is harvested from a spring near Knoxville, Tennessee, on the edge of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

It is filtered no less than nine times and is bottled directly at the source before ‘it makes its way to the upper class, upscale restaurants and hotels in the luxury bottle.’

The water is slightly alkaline and ‘pleasantly light with a delicately sweet note.’

Both Nevas and Minus 181 waters come from sources in Germany

Minus 181 Water ($46 for 681 ml bottle)

Taking its name from the 181-meter drill plunged into the well to obtain the water, Minus 181 is harvested from northern Germany where it flows over deep rock shaped by the ice age.

The water has been naturally filtered by the earth over centuries to create a pure and crystal-clear liquid chock full of minerals, according to the company.

Minus 181 water is bottled untreated in glass bottles in a small factor directly above the fountain it’s taken from.

The artisanal spring it comes from makes the water soft and pleasant to drink and a good partner for delicatessen and aromatic foods.

NEVAS Cuvée Carbonated Water ($28.99 for 750 ml bottle)

Coming in a bottle that more resembles a high-end champagne, NEVAS water combines the water of two natural springs in Germany, claiming this leads to the best mineralization and taste.

Both of the artisanal wells are hundreds of years old and give the water a high natural calcium content due to the layers of rock surrounding the sources.

With its finely sparkling carbonic acid, NEVAS water offers an ‘unforgettable, tingling drinking experience’ and impresses with its ‘unmistakable’ taste and high quality, and has previously won an award for its taste.

AQA FINELLI Natural and Gentle Fizz Water ($8 for 750 ml bottle)

Billing itself as ‘Germany’s new concept water for upscale gastronomy, AQA FINELLI’s water hails from the Taunus Nature Park in central Germany. The company says its water comes from artisanal springs and is bottled by hand close to the source. 

It contains some minerals, including calcium and chlorine, as well as bicarbonate, all of which give the water a soft and neutral taste and an ‘unobtrusive sweetness.’

Its gentle fizz water is carbonated by hand and gives the liquid a touch of fizz with very small bubbles, making the sparkling water ‘an excellent companion at the table.’

In bottles that look more like a chardonnay or pinot grigio, the waters will run you $8 each.  

AQA FINELLI waters are described as ‘Germany’s new water concept for upscale gastronomy’

ST. LUAPI Natural Water ($3 for 750 ml bottle)

At a much more reasonable price, this ST. LUAPI’s natural water comes in a limited design edition of the ‘Blue Beast’ bottle and isn’t just for drinking – it also ‘complements your lifestyle.’

The company said: ‘This extraordinary, still mineral water will enchant your senses and take your thirst-quenching routine to a whole new level.’

The water comes from a ‘fascinating,’ and one of the purest springs in Spain,’ making it a true gift of nature.’

It has a dry taste with an ‘impressive’ calcium concentration, as well as a touch of magnesium, and the company said ‘this water is not only refreshing, but also health-promoting.’

It added: ‘ST. LUAPI was designed not only to satisfy your thirst, but also to complement your lifestyle. Our limited design edition “Blue Beast” brings the cool factor to your drinking pleasure. 

‘This product is intended not only for teenagers but also for young-at-heart adults who value quality, taste and style.’

Poland Spring Water ($1 for 750 ml bottle)

The widely recognized and familiar bottle of Poland Spring can be purchased in nearly any drug or grocery store.

A familiar name and recognizable bottle, Poland Spring is readily available at virtually any drug or grocery store.

Hailing from ‘carefully selected springs across Maine,’ Poland Spring comes from 100 percent natural spring sources, the company said. 

And just as it sounds, spring water in general comes from natural springs formed from an underground source and is the most common type of bottled water. 

This type of water is considered pre-purified because it has traveled through natural filters like limestone, sandstone and clay.

Spring water is popular because it naturally contains traces of minerals, such as magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium, which play essential roles in bodily functions.

The water source of Poland Spring is cold spring water flowing from glacial deposits during the Ice Age. The springs bubble up through sand and gravel, ‘providing the perfect recipe for refreshing spring water.’ 

Tap Water (Free)

As its name implies, this water comes straight from your faucet and costs absolutely nothing. It is typically taken from a dam or river and supplied to homes through pipes. 

While it can be used for household tasks like watering plants or cooking, not all tap water is safe to drink and it needs to be tested to ensure it meets standards set by local water authorities.

In the US, tap water is filtered to remove contaminants and is sometimes referred to as purified water.

Common Types of Water 

Tap Water

As its name implies, this water comes straight from your faucet. It is typically taken from a dam or river and supplied to homes through pipes. While it can be used for household tasks like watering plants or cooking, not all tap water is safe to drink and it needs to be tested to ensure it meets standards set by local water authorities.

In the US, tap water is filtered to remove contaminants and is sometimes referred to as purified water.

Spring Water

Just as it sounds, this type of water comes from natural springs formed from an underground source. It is the most common type of bottled water. What makes spring water different is you get it straight from the source and it is considered pre-purified because it has traveled through natural filters like limestone, sandstone and clay.

Spring water is popular because it naturally contains traces of minerals, such as magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium, which play essential roles in bodily functions.

Mineral Water

Mineral water is similar to spring in that it comes from groundwater. While spring water is considered to be naturally purified, mineral water needs to be filtered through a process that includes adding minerals or salts to it. While spring water comes from a natural formation of water, mineral may come from a manmade formation of water.

Some mineral waters may also be referred to as electrolyte water, and vice versa. Electrolytes are charged minerals that conduct electricity in the body and regulate blood pressure, help the heart contract and maintain a healthy pH level in the body. These include the same nutrients as spring water.

While some brands may specifically market electrolyte water, most people can get the same benefits and taste for a lower price with mineral water.

Distilled Water

This type of water usually has a bland taste as it has been stripped of important minerals such as calcium, sodium and magnesium. It contains just water’s elements: hydrogen and oxygen. Because distilled water lacks the minerals that support bodily processes and give water its refreshing taste, health experts say there are limited benefits to drinking it and the taste is often quite bland.

Alkaline Water

The term alkaline refers to a water’s pH level, which measures how acidic something is. It contains electrolytes, or charged minerals such as calcium, potassium, magnesium or iron, all of which determine its alkalinity. Alkaline water often has a pH level of eight or nine, compared to natural water’s level of seven.

While there is no definitive ruling on alkaline water’s health benefits, some studies have found it may lead to better blood flood and improve bone density in women. One mouse study found those that consumed this type of water had improved markers of aging in their DNA.

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