Mon. Apr 15th, 2024
alert-–-major-update-after-molly-the-magpie-was-ripped-away-from-his-dog-best-friendsAlert – Major update after Molly the Magpie was ripped away from his dog best friends

Molly the magpie’s carers have revealed the world-famous bird is ‘happy and healthy’ weeks after he was seized by wildlife rangers.

Gold Coast couple Juliette Wells and Reece Mortensen rescued and adopted Molly (who was first thought to be female) in 2020 after he fell from his nest.

Molly quickly became a close friend of the couple’s Staffordshire bull terriers Peggy and Ruby, which Ms Wells began documenting on social media, showing the trio cuddling, playing together and the magpie barking like a pup. 

After garnering more than 2million followers online, several complaints were made to Queensland’s Department of Environment, Science and Innovation (DESI) – as it’s illegal in the state to keep native wildlife without a permit.

The teary-eyed couple were forced to surrender Molly to authorities on March 1 and have not seen him since or had any information about his wellbeing.

But on Tuesday, the pair posted to social media saying they received ‘a long-awaited phone call from someone who works closely with the director general of DESI’.

The carers of Molly the magpie - who became world famous in recent weeks after being taken away by Queensland wildlife officers - shared some good news on Tuesday. Molly is pictured with Juliette Wells and Staffordshire bull terrier Peggy

The carers of Molly the magpie – who became world famous in recent weeks after being taken away by Queensland wildlife officers – shared some good news on Tuesday. Molly is pictured with Juliette Wells and Staffordshire bull terrier Peggy

READ MORE: Major development in magpie saga as hopes rise he will soon be united with best dog friends Peggy and Ruby 

Molly the magpie is pictured with one of her dog best friends

Molly the magpie is pictured with one of her dog best friends

The breakthrough came after the story had made international headlines prompting Queensland Premier Steven Miles had got involved.

‘To say we are relieved is an understatement,’ the couple wrote, after being assured that Molly was safe and well.

‘We were told he was healthy, happy and in good spirits (but) weren’t told of his location to protect his safety.’ 

Last Thursday Mr Miles said DESI ‘stands ready’ to train the couple so Molly could be legally returned to them.

Ms Wells and Mr Mortensen said they ‘weren’t given too much detail but we were assured that DESI are currently looking at options to proceed with what the Premier had suggested.

‘The legalities of the situation is not an easy fix and it’s a process through legal frameworks.

‘We will be contacted again by the end of the week with the process and updates.’

The couple said they had been unable to obtain the right wildlife caring permit due to their social media presence, with more than 785,000 followers on Instagram.

They added that it had been a stressful time for them and their dogs, who are unsure why their friend is no longer flying through the home and playing with them.

‘Whenever they hear birds in the backyard they’ll run out to see if it is Molly,’ Ms Wells said. ‘Peggy is clingy and depressed as well.’

Molly the magpie is pictured with her best friends Peggy and Ruby, who are Staffordshire bull terriers

Molly the magpie is pictured with her best friends Peggy and Ruby, who are Staffordshire bull terriers

Molly became a global phenomenon after Ms Wells, a blogger from Coomera in Queensland, started creating content highlighting the unlikely 'interspecies friendship' between an n magpie and her pair of staffies

Molly became a global phenomenon after Ms Wells, a blogger from Coomera in Queensland, started creating content highlighting the unlikely ‘interspecies friendship’ between an n magpie and her pair of staffies 

The seizure of Molly sparked outrage on social media, with a petition calling for the bird to be returned to its Gold Coast home.

Mr Miles backed the family, saying he was ‘most interested in what is in the best interests of the animal and if the department can work with the family to reunite them in a way that is legal, I would support them’.

‘I think sometimes common sense needs to prevail.’

Mr Mortensen said ‘We don’t definitely know we’re going to get him back but there is a light at the end of the tunnel.’

DESI said it was working with the family for the best outcome for Molly.

‘The department has contacted the couple to assure them that Molly is being well cared for and that options are being examined for the bird’s future care,’ a DESI spokesperson said.

‘Our priority is the ongoing welfare of the magpie, and the bird is safe, undergoing rehabilitation and has full access to veterinary care.’

Ms Wells took Molly home in 2020, suspecting it had been abandoned by its parents

Ms Wells took Molly home in 2020, suspecting it had been abandoned by its parents

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