Sat. Apr 20th, 2024
alert-–-now-that’s-a-lot-of-cash-in-the-attic!-18th-century-chinese-vases-found-in-a-loft-and-valued-at-just-100-sell-at-auction-for-260,000Alert – Now that’s a LOT of cash in the attic! 18th century Chinese vases found in a loft and valued at just £100 sell at auction for £260,000

A pair of Chinese vases that were found in an attic and valued at £100 have sold for a whopping £260,000 after they were discovered to be 18th century treasures.

The two 10 inches tall matching pieces were brought into an auctioneers by the ‘working class’ vendor, a man in his late 30s, who was clearing out his late mother’s home.

They had been tucked away in the loft of the terraced property in Portsmouth, Hampshire, for decades and he had no idea of their existence.

The blue and white ‘bianhu’ vases are decorated with bats and peaches which symbolise blessings and longevity in imperial China.

The blue and white 'bianhu' vases are decorated with bats and peaches which symbolise blessings and longevity in imperial China

The blue and white ‘bianhu’ vases are decorated with bats and peaches which symbolise blessings and longevity in imperial China

The six-character mark of the Qianlong Emperor (1736-95) was spotted on their bases

The six-character mark of the Qianlong Emperor (1736-95) was spotted on their bases

READ MORE: Incredible 17th century painting originally valued at $14k sells for $14 MILLION at Sotheby’s auction after collectors uncovered stunning secret

The auctioneers inspected them and spotted the six-character mark of the Qianlong Emperor (1736-95) on their bases.

However, they believed they were 20th century copies because they were in such good condition.

It is known for forgers to stick old Emperor markings on new antiques to make them appear older and therefore more important and valuable.

Nesbits Auctions, of Southsea, Hampshire, showed the vases to other antique experts who agreed with their assessment, prompting their modest estimate of £100.

But after posting pictures of the vases online, they were bombarded with requests to view them from Far East collectors who believed they were legitimate 18th century pieces.

Dan Tricker, saleroom manager at Nesbits, said: ‘Ahead of the sale there was a very heavy amount of interest in them with collectors coming down from London to inspect them.’

It is known for forgers to stick old Emperor markings on new antiques to make them appear older and therefore more important and valuable but these were legitimate

It is known for forgers to stick old Emperor markings on new antiques to make them appear older and therefore more important and valuable but these were legitimate

After 20 minutes of bidding in the saleroom a Chinese buyer paid £260,000 for them - 2,600 times their valuation

After 20 minutes of bidding in the saleroom a Chinese buyer paid £260,000 for them – 2,600 times their valuation

And after 20 minutes of bidding in the saleroom a Chinese buyer paid £260,000 for them – 2,600 times their valuation.

The auctioneers said it is a ‘life-changing’ sum for the stunned vendor who hadn’t been able to afford a holiday until now.

Mr Tricker said: ‘He is renovating his home and had thought he could not afford to go on holiday this year, but now he can go on multiple trips!’