Mon. Apr 15th, 2024
alert-–-fran-drescher-pays-tribute-to-father-morty-following-his-death-at-94-after-battle-with-parkinson’s-disease:-‘i’m-happy-he-saw-my-success-as-a-labor-leader’Alert – Fran Drescher pays tribute to father Morty following his death at 94 after battle with Parkinson’s disease: ‘I’m happy he saw my success as a labor leader’

Fran Drescher’s father Morty Drescher passed away at the age of 94 on March 20, following a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. 

In light of her father’s passing, the actress was unable to attend the New York Women in Film & Television’s 44th annual Muse Awards for Vision and Achievement on Wednesday, where she was scheduled to receive an award. 

She conveyed her gratitude and regret for her absence through a message sent to a  SAG-AFTRA rep, and paid tribute to her late father, according to Page Six. 

‘It still feels untenable how permanent the loss of this great man is,’ Fran wrote. ‘His values were always in the right place. He honored and respected everyone equally. He understood the important things in this life, love of family, simple pleasures and living in gratitude.’ Fran wrote.

The Hollywood heavyweight credited Morty with the skills she employs as President of SAG-AFTRA since 2021.

Fran Drescher's father Morty Drescher passed away at the age of 94 on March 20 following a long battle with Parkinson's disease; pictured in January

Fran Drescher’s father Morty Drescher passed away at the age of 94 on March 20 following a long battle with Parkinson’s disease; pictured in January

In light of her father's passing, the actress was unable to attend the New York Women in Film & Television's 44th annual Muse Awards for Vision and Achievement on Wednesday, where she was scheduled to receive an award; Fran's dad Morty (L) and mom Sylvia (R) in 2005

In light of her father’s passing, the actress was unable to attend the New York Women in Film & Television’s 44th annual Muse Awards for Vision and Achievement on Wednesday, where she was scheduled to receive an award; Fran’s dad Morty (L) and mom Sylvia (R) in 2005

‘I am his daughter and I am so happy he got to see me not only achieve success as an actor, but even more importantly as a labor leader because doing volunteer work on behalf of the greater good was the ethics by which he raised me.’

Morty appeared on Fran’s hit sitcom The Nanny as both her fictional father, Morty Fine, and her uncle Stanley Fine during it run from 1993 to 1999.

He also guest-starred on two episodes of the WB sitcom Living With Fran in 2005.

In a separate statement regarding Morty’s death, Fran told US Weekly: ‘He was a good friend to many people both at work and within his community. 

‘He was an amazing father who taught my sister [Nadine Drescher] and I to swim, ride a bicycle and drive a car. He was the best husband to my mom [Sylvia Drescher] and remained madly in love with her until his last breath.’ 

She added: ‘Always, the life of the party, he was funny and smart. Known within our circles of family and friends to always recite Casey At The Bat, one of his favorite poems.’ 

In a December 2023 essay for The Daily Beast, Fran had previously discussed her father’s struggle with Parkinson’s Disease. 

‘He has gone from once being a white-collar systems analyst and very athletic to, at 94, now being an invalid, barely able to transfer from bed to wheelchair or take a brief supervised walk with his walker,’ she wrote. 

'It still feels untenable how permanent the loss of this great man is,' Fran wrote; pictured in 2016

‘It still feels untenable how permanent the loss of this great man is,’ Fran wrote; pictured in 2016

The Hollywood heavyweight credited Morty with the skills she employs as President of SAG-AFTRA since 2021; pictured in 2006

The Hollywood heavyweight credited Morty with the skills she employs as President of SAG-AFTRA since 2021; pictured in 2006

'I am his daughter and I am so happy he got to see me not only achieve success as an actor, but even more importantly as a labor leader because doing volunteer work on behalf of the greater good was the ethics by which he raised me,'; pictured in 2005

‘I am his daughter and I am so happy he got to see me not only achieve success as an actor, but even more importantly as a labor leader because doing volunteer work on behalf of the greater good was the ethics by which he raised me,’; pictured in 2005

‘But without question, the only reason he is still alive and has quality of life is because of my mother’s commitment to preserving that quality of life’ Fran gushed about her 89-year-old mother Sylvia. 

She added: ‘My mother is by far the most heroic person I have ever had the privilege of knowing.’ 

Fran’s emotional messages come after her appearance at the 2024 Oscars where she spoke about presiding over negotiations during the SAG union’s historic months-long strike last year. 

‘I feel very honored to be representing SAG-AFTRA as the president after a long and arduous strike and now we come and celebrate this marvelous industry and ourselves triumphantly,’ she said on the red carpet. 

In 2021, Fran initiated her bid for the presidency of the SAG-AFTRA union, securing victory in the election against actor Matthew Modine in September of that same year. 

Nearly two years later, SAG-AFTRA members voted overwhelmingly to authorize a strike action. 

Fran promptly announced the union’s intention to strike on July 14, amid a labor dispute with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). 

This strike coincided with the WGA strike, which had commenced just over two months earlier. 

She added: 'Always, the life of the party, he was funny and smart. Known within our circles of family and friends to always recite Casey At The Bat, one of his favorite poems,' ;pictured in 2005

She added: ‘Always, the life of the party, he was funny and smart. Known within our circles of family and friends to always recite Casey At The Bat, one of his favorite poems,’ ;pictured in 2005

Fran's emotional messages come after her appearance at the 2024 Oscars where she spoke about presiding over negotiations during the SAG union¿s historic months-long strike last year

Fran’s emotional messages come after her appearance at the 2024 Oscars where she spoke about presiding over negotiations during the SAG union’s historic months-long strike last year 

Two major points of contention were streaming residuals and the regulation of self-tape auditions, including the use of artificial intelligence to digitally generate actors’ performances. 

A tentative agreement was reached on November 8, 2023, and ratified on December 5. 

Fran’s Hollywood career began in the 1970s with minor roles in films and television shows. 

She gained widespread recognition for her role in the hit sitcom The Nanny,which brought her two Emmy nominations. 

WHAT IS PARKINSON’S DISEASE AND WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

What is Parkinson’s disease?

Parkinson’s disease is a condition in which parts of the brain become progressively damaged over many years, according to the NHS website.

What are the symptoms?

The NHS says there are three major symptoms, including tremors or shaking, slowness of movement and muscle stiffness.

Other symptoms include problems with balance, loss of smell, nerve pain, excessive sweating and dizziness.

Some people can also experience lack of sleep, excessive production of saliva and problems swallowing, causing malnutrition and dehydration.

What are the early signs?

Symptoms can start gradually, sometimes beginning with a barely noticeable tremor in just one part of the body.

In the early stages, people may show little or no expression, and their arms may not swing when they walk.

Speech can also become soft or slurred, with the condition worsening over time.

What are the causes?

Some scientists believe a combination of genetic and environmental factors are the cause of Parkinson’s disease.

It occurs after a person experiences loss of nerve cells in a part of their brain.

However, it is not known why the loss of nerve cells associated with the condition takes place but research is ongoing to identify potential causes.

Scientists say genetics factor can increase a person’s risk of developing the disease, and can therefore run in families.

Other factors attributed to causing the condition include environmental problems such as pollution, though such links are inconclusive, the NHS says.

How is it diagnosed?

No tests can conclusively show if a person has the disease, but doctors can make a diagnosis based on symptoms, medical history and a physical examination.

A specialist will ask the person to write or draw, walk or speak to check for any common signs of the condition.

They may even check for difficulty making facial expressions and slowness of limb movement.

How many people are affected?

Around 145,000 people live with Parkinson’s disease in the UK, according to the charity Parkinson’s UK.

What happens if someone is diagnosed?

According to the charity, it is a legal requirement to contact the DVLA, as a diagnosed person will need to have a medical or driving assessment.

The organisation also advises people to contact any insurance providers and find out about financial support available.

People are also encouraged to partake in more exercise.

Can it be treated?

Although there is no cure, a number of treatments are available to help reduce the symptoms.

The main remedies include medication, exercise, therapy and surgery, which can help people in different ways.

What medication is available and what are the side effects?

Medication can be helpful in improving the main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, such as shaking and movement problems.

There are three main types which are commonly used, levodopa, dopamine agonist or a MAO-B inhibitor. Each can affect people in different ways.

The drugs do have some side effects, including impulsive and compulsive behaviour, hallucinations, sleep issues and blood pressure changes.

What therapy is available?

There are several therapies available to those with Parkinson’s through the NHS.

Among them are physiotherapy to reduce muscle stiffness, occupational therapy to help with completing day-to-day tasks and speech and language coaching.

Does this change the way you live?

Most people’s life expectancy will not change a great deal, though more advanced symptoms can lead to increased disability and poor health.

It can also cause some cognitive issues and changes to mood and mental health.

Those with Parkinson’s are encouraged to exercise more often, with scientists saying 2.5 hours of exercise a week is enough to slow the progression of symptoms.

error: Content is protected !!